We got the switch panel mounted, drilled and soldered today.. The passenger side is removable for serviceability, and we installed a custom fuse box behind the panel. I’m waiting on some custom power steering fittings from Georgia, and I still have to drop my tank. I’ve got to hard-mount my battery, drill and mount my harnesses, dial my suspension in, and I should be able to hit a couple grassroots events before the weather turns sour.

We got the switch panel mounted, drilled and soldered today.. The passenger side is removable for serviceability, and we installed a custom fuse box behind the panel. I’m waiting on some custom power steering fittings from Georgia, and I still have to drop my tank. I’ve got to hard-mount my battery, drill and mount my harnesses, dial my suspension in, and I should be able to hit a couple grassroots events before the weather turns sour.

Cockpit.
I die-cut the holes for the smaller gauges, and carefully took a small die grinder to the 5” hole required for my tach. After measuring and re-measuring, I got them mounted solid and straight, and began work on fabricating my switch panel/center console..
I found a shift boot on ebay from a 1976 Toyota Corolla, and despite not being measured on the auction posting, it fit my tranny tunnel with ease.

Cockpit.

I die-cut the holes for the smaller gauges, and carefully took a small die grinder to the 5” hole required for my tach. After measuring and re-measuring, I got them mounted solid and straight, and began work on fabricating my switch panel/center console..

I found a shift boot on ebay from a 1976 Toyota Corolla, and despite not being measured on the auction posting, it fit my tranny tunnel with ease.

After a long week of DJ’ing clubs and shooting photos for a local publication, I finally got a chance to work on the LS-FC last night. A massive pile of parts have accumulated on my kitchen table, and this week I’ll finally have the time to install them.

Tim and I fabricated the dashboard last night; there was more than enough material, and the dimensions of the front of the dash fit almost perfect. 

It attaches to the stock dash mounting points. Swag.

Huge thanks to Tim Weiss for the jesus-like guidance he’s given me on my car build….

in typical item-b.com fashion, I was browsing CL early one morning and saw my neighbor was getting rid of an old 1969 custom Ford Highboy 4x4 he had for 1000 bucks…. Needless to say, I drove the few miles over; the 390 motor mated to a 4-speed manual purred like a kitten,4x4 worked, and there wasn’t too much rust.I drove it home.I later researched the truck and discovered that it’s sitting on a 80’s F350 dually chassis, with custom semi-truck style rear airbags and 4x4 conversion with a dana 60 axle up front….Score.

in typical item-b.com fashion, I was browsing CL early one morning and saw my neighbor was getting rid of an old 1969 custom Ford Highboy 4x4 he had for 1000 bucks…. 

Needless to say, I drove the few miles over; the 390 motor mated to a 4-speed manual purred like a kitten,4x4 worked, and there wasn’t too much rust.

I drove it home.

I later researched the truck and discovered that it’s sitting on a 80’s F350 dually chassis, with custom semi-truck style rear airbags and 4x4 conversion with a dana 60 axle up front….

Score.

We found an affordable Miata on CL with a hardtop and coilovers, so Alexis and I pulled the trigger and got her a car to chase me in the hills with. We spent the better part of the last 3 days getting it kitted, painted, and ready for the road. Our new homie Adam drove it down from Seattle in the pouring rain, and got stuck at our place for a couple days while he figured out a ride home. Thanks for the car man! Stoked.

We’ve also been re-wiring the RX7, and are a few steps closer to getting it out on the track…. We finally extracted the last bits of the original rotary harness; it’s beginning to resemble a race car now…

She’s Alive….

Tim and I finally got the wiring sorted, and aside from hooking up a few gauges, installing harnesses, and a few other bits and pieces, the LS1-RX7 is finally moving under it’s own power…

I’ve had this car for 2 years and I’ve probably only driven it 30 times. Let the fun begin..

I’ve spent the better part of the last two days fitting the aero parts on the FC, and have begun to dig into the wiring (a mess!)…

I’ve employed the help of my neighbor, local wiring guru and general car guy Tim; he helped me get the turn signals straightened out on the bus after I had pinched a wire on the harness mounting a wall panel… 

We’ve decided to do a lot of the wiring from scratch; using what we can from the previous owners’ rats nest, while eliminating as much of the older, obsolete wiring as we go along.

Tim managed to find a kill switch that fits perfectly inside one of the massive die-cuts in my driver side window gusset. Sweet!